M-100 Message Board
M-100 Message Board
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 M-100 Message Forum
 6.9
 6.9 #521 Restoration
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 12

wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2014 :  09:04:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Work continues as I strive towards being able to spray primer on the bottom of the car by early 2015...

The MB Chassis manual says that the spare tire carrier should be the last item installed when reworking the rear clip. Because I lack 'some of the tooling' that would have been available to competent MB chassis repairmen, I've had to deviate from that plan a bit.

I have installed the two vertical panels that connect the rear of the inner fenders to the back panel. Before I welded them into place, I took the time to fit the spare tire carrier into place and discovered some more misalignment (surprise, surprise).

To help the reader understand what I'm working with, here's an image of the participants in the process:


The spare tire carrier is part #90. The trunk floor is part #30. The left-side vertical brace is part #58 (there's a mirror image part for the right side, not pictured here). The rear support beam for the rear panel (not pictured) is part #66.

Part #90 sits on top of #58 (and its counterpart), slides up under #30 and sits on top of #66.

That is fairly easy - it's the other places where #90 is attached under the car that make proper alignment of all the players critical.

In my first fitment attempt, I noticed a problem where the carrier sits on the rear brace. The lip from the carrier met cleanly on the passenger side, but there was a big gap on the driver's side.

Further inspection revealed that on the left side the section where the back of the tire carrier is to be welded to the floor of the trunk aligned perfectly. The back of the spare tire well is formed to present a horizontal lip that faces rearward. That lip is to be welded to the trunk floor across the spare tire opening. On the right side, the alignment was so bad that it would be nearly impossible to attach the two pieces.

In trying to figure out where a problem is, one must be careful to use known accurate points of reference. It wouldn't do any good to measure from new parts to new parts, as we've already determined that the placement of these new parts wasn't done properly.

Fortunately, the trunk floor (#90) is original, and shows no signs of deformation due to the wreck. So, the back edge of that panel that forms the opening where the spare tire cover is attached is a known good reference point. Measuring back from that folded edge to the rear support beam revealed an out of whack difference of just over 3/8" (9mm) left side vs. right side

Now, to be fair, it is possible that I caused this problem by how I attempted to lift the rear of the car when first it was placed on the rotisserie. Remember that almost none of the replacement panels were installed properly, and where they were attached, especially at the inner fenders, was structurally unsound due to rust.

I will note for the record that when I started this part of the repair, that I had some trouble getting the trunk lid to open. The latch was working properly, but the pin section from the trunk lid was stuck in the latch pocket. Not bad stuck but enough that it took a wooden wedge to separate the two. This was never a problem before the car went on the rotisserie. So, obviously, the latch, and the framework on which it was installed, had moved forward in the car relative to the trunk lid.

Anyway - before I welded the right-hand vertical panel into place, I used a spreader to force the rear panel back where it belonged. The mating point where the front of the spare tire carrier meets the trunk floor is spot-on on the driver's side, and about 1/8" off on the passenger side, but the meeting point of the spare tire carrier and the rear beam is spot-on.

Here you can see one of the first fitment tests for the spare tire carrier.


When I took all this apart, I discovered that the rear tow hook wasn't properly attached to the car. The tow hook as an assembly is welded to the spare tire carrier and gains strength by being also welded to the vertical brace on the right side of the car. It was only welded at one point. When I was satisfied with the placement of the spare tire carrier, I used a couple of self-tapping screws to make sure that each time I reinstalled the part, it went back in the same place.

The only way to solve the problem of the rear tow hook was to modify the hook frame to allow it to align with the vertical brace.

I started by cutting the vertical flange away from the horizontal plate where the tow hook is welded. The gap you see in the picture below, parallel to the stem of the tow hook, is where the two were separated.

Then, I took a piece of 3/4x3/4x1/8" angle iron (19x19x3.1mm) to create a gusset to rejoin the two sections. I also drilled several welding holes in the severed flange that would be for plug welds to attach the gusset to the flange.



Gusset set in place - as so:


I welded through the holes in the severed flange to attach it to the gusset. Then I reinstalled the spare tire carrier in the car and moved the flange until it properly aligned with the vertical brace and clamped the gusset to the horizontal plate before removing the spare tire carrier again.

A couple of tacking welds to hold it into place - then back into the car again to double-check the position.




Once satisfied that all was well, I welded it up.




I also took the time to add some welds to the tow hook itself.


The only weld from the factory other than the spot welds that held the tow hook bracket to the spare tire carrier was the one on the left side of this picture. I added the rest:


Before installing the spare tire carrier for the last time, I solved the problem of the leaking well. The bottom half of the spare tire well lips over the upper half. Why? I have no idea, but I'm sure MB had a good reason. Further, the edge of the lower piece curled out creating a lovely lip to catch water and funnel it right into the well under the tire. I took some time and with a body dolly and hammer I flattened out the lip and added some seam sealer to the assembly. This should get rid of the leaking problem - at least this one:


And so into the car goes the spare tire carrier, for the last time!






I left the repairs to the corners of the trunk floor where it meets the spare tire carrier until after the carrier was back in the car. If these sections were in place, it would have made it impossible to slide the carrier into place.

I've still got some work to do on the right side:


But the left side is done short of some finish grinding on the welds:


Once this is cleaned up, there are a few more plug welds on the left side of the trunk where the spare tire carrier meets the trunk floor, then the bottom piece for the right side well that joins the vertical brace to the rear fender needs to go in. After that, it's fix the hole I cut in the rear panel trying to get the old vertical brace out on the right side, and on to the ratty inner fenders (left & right) where they meet the outer fenders.

Once that's done - it's - are you ready for this???? Clean and Prep for PRIMER!!!!


W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
Go to Top of Page

bigblockbenz

USA
378 Posts

Posted - 12/09/2014 :  14:41:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Always impressed by your efforts Brian.
Go to Top of Page

wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2014 :  07:31:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks. I like posting progress up on the forum not only for others to see, but to remind me of how far I've come on this journey.

Last night, I finished up welding the two corner patches for the spare tire carrier and now I have to install the floor of the side well on the passenger side to call this part of the project "almost complete" The almost comes from needing to fit the replacement trunk lid (which is from a US 300SD, so it's aluminum and requires different springs) to make sure the latch assembly aligns properly.

The rear panel is still not welded to the cross brace (part #66 in the previous post). If there's an alignment problem (which I expect there will be) I can push the rear panel out somewhat in the center before welding the bottom section securely to the cross brace.

That task will have to wait until this weekend. It's nearly impossible to fit new trunk hinge/spring assemblies to a W116 car. One bolt attaches horizontally inside the trunk and the other attaches vertically from inside the package shelf at the rear glass. Really takes two people to do it quickly/right. Then there's fitting the trunk lid to the hinges - another job best left for an extra set of hands.

I am more than ready to move on to other work. I've spent the last several working sessions sitting cross-legged in the spare tire well. Even with a cushion in place, it's not a comfortable space.

Maybe my girth has something to do with this discomfort? Nah - couldn't be....

W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
Go to Top of Page

bigblockbenz

USA
378 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2014 :  14:20:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yeahbutt if you had less girth Brian, would you be as jolly (when you're 'living' outside of the trunk)?




Skip

Edited by - bigblockbenz on 12/10/2014 14:21:55
Go to Top of Page

wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2014 :  15:40:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Probably not. I was a skinny kid that grew into a chubby middle-aged adult.

I miss being skinny and all the flexibility that provided.

It's a lot easier to stay skinny than it is to get skinny...

As someone once said: "I'm in shape. Round is a shape."

W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
Go to Top of Page

wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2014 :  18:10:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Things are proceeding nicely with the trunk.

I finished up dressing the welds on the left front corner of the spare tire well:


And formed the piece to cover the hole on the right front corner of the spare tire well:


Finished:


Where the edges of the trunk well flange abutted the fenderwell, a set of carefully placed welds reinforces the connection and seals the joint - I did this on the left side as well.


In order to install the floor of the right hand side well, I needed to deal with some rust. The flakiness you see in this picture is the result of spraying liberally with rust-stop (phosphoric acid, if I remember correctly). The clarity of the picture isn't great either - this was pulled from a section of a much larger picture:


Here's what I removed as viewed from the outside. Thank Mr. Nikon for the lousy focus:


And here's the excised piece:


You can see what I was facing with the rust through:


And here's the replacement piece laying adjacent to the original:


Much as I'd like to say that I formed the replacement piece from a single section of metal, my skills and tools are no where near what it would take to accomplish that feat. As the picture shows, the piece is formed from 3 separate segments.


The picture as shown is not the final result. I spent some more time to finesse the result to more closely match the original.

Here it is tacked into place as viewed from inside the trunk:


And from the outside. Looks like one of the welds found some hidden rust - but that's nothing new...


What remains from this point is to do the final welding on the aforementioned patch, then install the well floor inside the trunk.

The bumper brace arrived from Tom Hanson the other day, and I'll have to adjust its size just like I did on the driver's side piece. Then I can install both of those items.

On Saturday, Tin helped me install the 300SD trunk (boot) lid I got as part of the purchase of #1164. For the uninformed, 300SD's came with aluminum hoods and aluminum trunk lids. Aluminum = no rust, and the existing trunk lid for #521 has some along the folded seam near the handle.

I wanted to see how the lid fit, especially in the latch area, where there was some binding from the original trunk lid. I wasn't sure if the binding was from latch alignment, or from unwelded sections of the car shifting around when it was on the rotisserie.

In order to swap a 300SD trunk lid for an original unit, you must have 300SD hinges with lower-tension springs. Without that, you risk knocking all your teeth out when the lid comes flying up the instance you press the release button.

I'm happy to report that the latch worked as I hoped.

Unfortunately, there is a fitment problem on the right hand corner at the back edge of the lid. The gap along the side of the fender starts out good at the hinge end and gradually swells to where there's a unacceptably large gap at the end.

Part of the instructions for reinstalling a quarter panel from the MB manuals say that nothing should be welded into place until the trunk lid is installed and gaps are checked. They even describe the necessary braces that should be attached from the ledge where the trunk lid gasket fits in an "X" fashion to properly position the fender upper edges before welding the back panel into place.

Before I call foul on the car, I need to compare the shape and size of the 300SD trunk lid vs. the original unit. If they're the same size, then I need to do some more work on the panel fitment in that area - not something I'm looking forward to.

If they're not the same size (the 300SD lid being smaller for some unknown reason), then I'll have to figure out whether I want to tackle fitting the car to the trunk lid better, or tackle fixing the rust on the original lid.

W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
Go to Top of Page

Vaifanatic

USA
21 Posts

Posted - 12/15/2014 :  03:16:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Awesome thread. Wish there were more folks like you around the San Antonio area.

I could use some assistance on some bodywork I have to do on a W136 170S I'm trying to bring back to life.

Will be following this thread closely!

Looking for a nice 6.9
Go to Top of Page

wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 01/03/2015 :  22:30:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Progress in December was limited due to a 6-year-old niece that is all about "American Girl" dolls. The hand-crafted doll-sized armoire that was well received took a lot of time.

I did get a few things done after gift delivery, and here are the details.

First, I finished up the patch in the lower quadrant of the passenger rear fender.

As seen from the outside:


Interior shot - I am pleased with how the "shelf" turned out.


After that, I was able to install the floor of the side well. This took a bit of tweaking - the end of the panel, where it met the rear valance below the tail lamps was poorly aligned. There was a gap of nearly 1/4" on the inside, tapering to a nice snug fit at the outside corner.

Solution was to cut a small pie-shaped piece out of the panel and weld the remaining edges back together. Don't have any close-ups of that work, but the results were satisfactory.


Extending the end of the bumper brace the way I did on the driver's side solved the length problem, but we have a hole alignment issue here just like on the driver's side:


First step is to weld the original hole up:


Trace the outline of the hole onto a section of plate of a similar thickness, then cut the piece to size:


Test fit - looks good:


Tack weld the patches into place:


Then finish welding and grinding:


Some primer and the repairs are all but invisible:


Set the braces into their proper location, trace a line from the hole through the fender to the back side of the brace, then cut the material away, leaving a nicely aligned bracket - passenger side:


and driver side:


Combination of spot and seam welds secure the braces into place:


All that remains is to patch the hole I torched in the rear panel when I was trying to remove the rusted braces from the trunk. Then it's on to fixing the inner fenders where they meet the outer fenders...

W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
Go to Top of Page

bigblockbenz

USA
378 Posts

Posted - 01/03/2015 :  23:38:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Enjoyed the progress show and tell pics Brian...but none of the armoire??

Go to Top of Page

Martin L

Australia
324 Posts

Posted - 01/04/2015 :  07:35:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I really enjoy this thread Brian. Thank you for continuing to update it. Inspiring stuff!!

300SEL 6.3 #6481
420SEL W126 Sold
560SEL #482259
560SEL #435064 300HP Full hydro suspension
300SEL M189 #1296
Go to Top of Page

arcijack

USA
475 Posts

Posted - 01/04/2015 :  10:42:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Brian you keep me inspired, question for you, i am ready to build a rotisserie for my car, but how are you attaching to the front of the car, thanks
Go to Top of Page

wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 01/04/2015 :  20:40:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I don't know how to post links to particular replies, so look on page 5, posting from 01/01/2014 for the attachment points for the rear, and page 6, posting from 04/03/2014 for the attachment points for the front.

W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
Go to Top of Page

wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2015 :  23:45:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In a recent post I spoke about a hole I needed to patch in the back panel. This hole comes from my vain attempt to remove the braces that run vertically from the inner fender to the rear panel and form the side of the wells on the sides of the trunk.

These items were installed as part of the repair to the car who knows how long ago, and they were brazed in place. Brass is a wonderful welding filler for Oxy/Acetylene torches - I've joined some very dissimilar metals in the past with this useful alloy. It goes on easy, but doesn't come apart that way.

The problem stems from the fact that there were numerous little patches of brass holding this part to the inner fender, to the spare tire carrier, to the rear panel and to the bottom pieces that enclose the side wells. Trying to heat the metal with an Oxy/Actylene torch at each weld point enough to soften the brass without burning through and be able to separate the parts long enough for the brass to cool ended up being more than I could manage on the passenger side. I ended up burning a hole through the rear panel before I finally gave up and cut the vertical brace into two pieces to make removal possible.

Anyway - this is the hole that must be patched. It's the last bit of work before I reattach the rotisserie to the rear of the car.


The best type of patch for this problem is a circular plug, but I don't have a punch to create one, so I'll improvise with a 1-1/8" (29mm) hole saw, with the pilot bit removed.


Installed in my drill press:


Clamp the sheet metal securely to the table, set the speed to a few hundred RPM and viola:


Next step is to trace the outline of the plug onto the car with my trusty carbide tipped scribe.

The same trusty carbide tipped scribe I used just last week to trace the outline of the bumper braces so I could sand away the primer where I needed to seam weld the braces to the well bottoms.

The same trusty carbide tipped scribe that has gone completely missing...

So - we'll punt and use a permanent marker and do the best we can. At this point, I noticed a crack to the left of the hole - we'll tend to that after we weld the plug into place.


A single-cut tree-shaped cutter in my die grinder is the tool for the job - made quick work of the hole.


As I'm leaning down to do some fine tuning on the hole, what's that I see through the tail-lamp hole?


Yep - the scribe - late to the party - we've already served the cake, you slacker!


Oh well - back to the task at hand - a magnetic block will hold the plug in place while I tack weld:


Mounted from the back side:


Plug installed in the hole ready for the welder. Note the arrows - it's a pain to try to align an almost-round plug in an almost-round hole in the test fitment phase. Need to know that the plug is going into place in the same orientation every time, or you'll run yourself batty:


First tack weld secures the plug:


And a lot of grinding and tacking and dressing later - even welded up the crack...


Next is to turn my attention to the really, really sloppy job where the rear fender joins the panel that forms the bottom of the rear window, inside the channel that houses the trunk seal:


A bit of work in the channel with a wire brush on a drill, and a brief detour up out of the channel reveals - and I'm sure you'll be as shocked as I was - BONDO HELL!


Nice and thick...


After I get most of the bondo removed down to bear metal, I'm picking around with my trusty carbide scribe and oops!!!


Is it just me, or does the hole kinda look like a sitting dog?


Here's a guide to the depth of the bondo - truly tragic:


And just when I thought it couldn't get any worse - here's the driver's side:


After the reveal, I changed cutters on the die grinder to a double-cut radius-end unit and went to work on the brass blob on the passenger side - looks better now, but I've got some REAL work ahead of me to make this work:


In order to get a true feel for what will need to be done to correct this mess, I need to remove the rear window. It needs to come out anyway for paint and to have the hard-as-concrete seal replaced, so tonight I worked on taking out the interior trim panels - the panel above the visors, the A-pillar covers, the lateral panels that run above the doors and the rear panel - all came out without so much as a single broken clip. The vinyl is still pliable after all these years, so I'm hopeful that with some careful cleaning and maybe a respray with some SEM paints in the proper bamboo color, that these original parts will go back in and look stellar.

The car is reattached to the rotisserie in the rear, and I've cut away most of the gasket from the inside across the bottom and up the sides, staying well clear of the defroster wires. I've loosened the gasket where it was stuck to the car on the outside across the bottom, but the window is still stuck in place.

I've got a couple of large suction cups that I'll use to pull it from the outside as opposed to pushing from the inside, but first I've got some more cutting to do.

Thanks for reading!


W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII

Edited by - wbrian63 on 01/06/2015 23:51:03
Go to Top of Page

wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2015 :  23:08:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A sharp safety knife was the ticket to removing the rear window. I sliced off the outer section of the window gasket and with the aid of the suction cups, the glass came free.

Then came the task of carefully disengaging the wires for the heated rear window from the gasket so the glass could be removed - which was a success.

Then I cleaned the window channel out with a mix of a brass brush, a small sharp chisel to clean the sealant and some mineral spirits to clean everything up.

I'm missing one of the clips that holds the upper passenger trim in place, and another clip is damaged, but otherwise things are OK in that category.

As I was removing the outer layer of the gasket, I feared that I would discover massive rust-through, but that proved not to be the case either. For sure there is some heavy pitting on the passenger side that will have to be removed and replaced, but nothing I haven't seen or solved before.

However, there were two holes discovered that are puzzling:




Obviously these will have to be filled.

With a coarse grit 3" paint scourer disk in my pneumatic grinder, I started chasing away the bondo. I removed paint, some very thick high-build primer, and bondo, working away from the areas revealed on Tuesday back until I didn't find any more bondo.

As much as some of the body repair was a hatchet job, whomever they had doing mud work had some real talent. I would have never guessed how extensive the repairs were and how much bondo was used.

Here's where the left rear fender meets the C-pillar:


And the companion on the right side:


While a bit fuzzy (have I mentioned before I HATE my camera?), this picture shows how the fender is joined to the car around the back window. They just flanged what they could, and lapped the new part over on top of the old.




Here's some not-so-good work on the driver's side at the corner of the trunk. I've got a lot of work ahead of me to fix this mess:


Here you can see some of the worst pitting - this section will have to come out and be replaced. There is similar damage on the driver side. This is likely due to water being trapped under the window gasket against the paint and slowly working it's way through the paint and the bondo to come into contact with the bare metal underneath.


And where the fender laps over the original body parts - more pitting that will have to be cut away:


Where the fender overlaps the original chassis parts in visible areas of the car, they flanged the body and tacked the new panel in place. Unfortunately, they didn't completely weld the part into place, and not closing up the seam completely leaves an opportunity for moisture to get underneath the flange and rot the assembly out from the rear.

I'm going to do some test welds to see if I can completely close up the seam on the C pillars. This may prove a problem because I'm not certain I can get all of the bondo out, and any remaining material will give me grief when trying to get a good penetrating weld.

Likely I'll have to remake a lot of the area at the seam between the trunk opening and the rear window.

Much as I'd like to separate the panels at their join points and do a proper butt weld, that isn't in the cards.

First, there's the structural aspect. The load to the rear fenders where they tie in to the body at the C-pillars is very high, and the car has been hanging on a rotisserie for months and months. I'm not confident that if I separated the panels that I'd be able to get everything back into alignment to weld. I'm not suggesting that the car has been tweaked, but even if I supported the car to take the vertical load off of the rear fenders, I'd not be surprised if when I broke the two panels apart that the rear fender would drop slightly and open the seam at the C-pillar even further.

There's nothing technically wrong with the way the panels are installed - it's just not the way I would have done it.

The seams are not in an area where water can get to the backside of the joint, so there's less risk of rust-through.

There was a fair amount of bondo used to cover the dips in the panel, but it wasn't excessive. The worst areas had maybe up to 1/8" (3mm) and I'll see what I can do to bump the panels out a bit to reduce that requirement, but the back side of both the C-pillar and the section between the trunk and the back window are double-layered assemblies and there's no way to get to the back side.

I'll post more when I have more to post.

Thanks for reading

W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII

Edited by - wbrian63 on 01/08/2015 23:13:57
Go to Top of Page

wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 01/22/2015 :  23:36:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Progress continues on the quest to eliminate the rust on #521. Sometimes I feel like Don Quixote tilting at windmills, without any aid from a trusty sidekick, even one riding a burro....

Working on the gasket channel for the passenger side of the trunk - which looked like at the start:


Then with all the extra brass and body filler removed:


I don't have the tools or skills to form the replacement piece as one unit, so we work in sections. First the bottom of the channel. Formed it as an "L" flange that I put through the stretcher to form the curve:


Then formed the top piece, also run through the stretcher to form the curve:


Carefully ground until the patch fits exactly:


Tacked into place:


Lots of welding and grinding yields a satisfactory result:


Then form the next piece of the puzzle and tack it into place:


The ledge where the window gasket meets the body and holds the rear window in place needs some help:


Cutting away the rusty metal reveals more rust underneath on the original metal:


Careful cutting with a body saw extracts the piece:


This tells me that the method practiced by the previous repairmen in just tacking the body pieces into place with a few welds and trusting the body filler and paint to keep what's beneath free of exposure to moisture was (not surprisingly) a bad idea.

I formed a single piece to mate back up with the flange and fixed that into place. That left a tiny sliver opening which was filled with this patch:






Virtually disappears under a coating of weld-thru primer:


As noted previously, just a few tack welds with lots of body filler isn't a good idea. I won't be able to undo the overlap assembly that joins the rear fender to the C-pillar, but I can most certainly weld up the entire seam, beginning progress shown here:


Thanks for reading.



W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 12 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
M-100 Message Board © 2002-2015 International M-100 Group, Inc. Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.38 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.06