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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2013 :  21:58:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More progress from Monday, 9/16 and Tuesday 9/17.

With the decision to pull the motor in order to properly strip and repaint not only the fenders but basically the entire front clip of the car, on Monday, I took on the particularly nasty task of removing the exhaust system and driveshaft.

The exhaust is a butchery job - it looks like it was replaced at some point at a local muffler shop, with pipes that are too small for the application. Notice how they reused the flare portion where the pipe meets the manifold?





Surprisingly, only 1 of the 4 bolts that hold the exhaust to the manifold gave me any grief, and it appears that it was one replaced by someone at some point, as it wasn't a 13mm head like the rest.

Pulling the driveshaft wasn't too difficult - the bolts on the front flex plate came off with little persuasion. The rears, however, were apparently installed by that Grunter fellow - - had to get the rattle gun out to break them loose, which meant a face full of dirt and grime... Thanks Grunter...

When I pulled the transmission support to get at the front flex disc, I was reminded why it's not a good idea to let seals leak on cars, particularly when rubber items are in the path of the leaking seal. The transmission mount has Melted...





As I was removing the driveshaft, the carrier bearing revealed just how completely shot it was...





Still working slowly to remove all of the PVC stone guard from the driver's fender...





I'm not certain how I'm going to get at all the undercoat and grime around the cup that retains the top of the strut - the right-angle grinder that I'm using, combined with the peculiar angles of the fender components means this is as far as I can get with pneumatic/mechanical assistance. You can see the remaining coating on the left-hand side of the mounting cup.





This view is the interior of the recess where the upper control arm mounts. The shiny spot at the back is the extent of the reach of the grinder - going to have to do better than this...


Tonight, I finished (98%) stripping the coating on the exterior side of the fenderwell - a little surface rust to be found, but nothing scaly at all...






I've managed to purchase the last two large tools needed for the motor/suspension work. The largest wrench required to service the dry-sump hoses is a 36mm. My stock of wrenches goes up to 32mm only. Here's a comparison of the Armstrong 36mm I just got vs a 30mm Craftsman unit - just a tad more beefy, wouldn't you say?



Both wrenches are USA-stamped - getting anything Craftsman with USA on it is becoming a real challenge. I've had the 30mm wrench for about 4 years.




W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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oversize

Australia
261 Posts

Posted - 09/18/2013 :  18:23:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's sad to see how badly these cars have been neglected and butchered over the years. But it's reassuring when you see a new owner that gives a damn and saves all that wonderful engineering! I think I better go back in the shed and DO something!

Mark


Last of the steel Mercedes

2001 Ford AU Fairmont Ghia 5L (Deep Blue)
1980 450SEL #101122 (Green Lantern)
1979 6.9 #6301 (Blue Flame)
1979 6.9 #5541 (Red Bull)
1979 6.9 #5318 (Silver Arrow)
1979 6.9 #5298 (Man o War)
1978 6.9 #4248 (Skye Blue)
1979 6.9 #3686 (Moby Dick)
1975 450SEL #28414 (Gold Nugget)
1957 Buick Roadmaster 73A (Titanic)
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alabbasi

USA
2869 Posts

Posted - 09/18/2013 :  18:24:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I need to buy stock in whomever makes flap discs. Great work Brian.


With best regards

Al


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S class

South Africa
955 Posts

Posted - 09/19/2013 :  11:12:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Brian, we get into the last corners that the grinder can't get to with a selection of rotary wire brushes mounted in an electric drill. Its less effective than the stripping discs, but one has no choice. Wear goggles - the brushes like to shed steel hairs at speed...



116.036
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202.018
202.026




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etmerritt33

USA
1415 Posts

Posted - 09/20/2013 :  09:01:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don't know what you are contemplating relative to exhaust system replacement?? I put a Time Valve 100% euro stainless steel exhaust system on my 6.9. Included is a euro muffler. I am very pleased with the system and obviously expect it to last a long time.
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 10/11/2013 :  21:14:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Timevalve will be the source for the replacement exhaust. $pendy, but worth the money.

W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 10/11/2013 :  22:22:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've not forgotten this project, but have been sidetracked by things that must be done before I can continue with the stripping of the fenderwells.

I've decided to pull the motor and transmission. This will give me the opportunity to clean the engine compartment 100% and paint it back in the original Cypress Green that it should be, at the same time I paint the fenderwells.

I've got work to do on the motor as well. New seals, etc, plus new intake rubbers. To facilitate this - the engine needs to go on a stand.

After viewing the stand that Art & Justin built, I decided that I was up to the task of creating one "like" that one.

Part of the "problem" of creating something like this is that I'm missing several critical pieces of data:

1) How much does a fully dressed M-100 motor from a 6.9 really weigh?
2) How much stress will that weight, when bolted to a plate and suspended in mid-air place on the device trying to overcome gravity's strong desire to drop the block to the pavement?
3) Any sort of engineering training that would allow me to take the value from #1 and calculate the answer to #2.

So, true to my nickname "Bullet-Proof-Brian", what I constructed (I think) is an engine stand that takes overkill to the next level.

Started out on eBay for a pair of pillow block bearings:


These have a 2 inch (50.8mm) bore.

Art & Justin's use of a right angle gear box to rotate the block was a stroke of genius, so I sourced one - also from eBay.



I had originally ordered one about 60% as big as this one, but the seller didn't have the one I wanted, so he sold me this one instead. It's quite a bit larger, but there was no additional cost.



At this point in the process, things got a little screwy - mostly my fault. The original gear case had a 1" drive shaft, so I ordered a set of spider shaft couplings from McMaster Carr - this on the same day as the completed eBay purchase, but before the seller contacted me.

The gear box arrived the same day as the shaft couplings, and I took one look at the output shaft and realized that it was much larger than 1". I think I measured it and came up with 1-1/2".

Ordered a piece of 2" 1018 rod for the shaft - also from eBay. This came in at the same time as the gear box, so I gave it to Tin, who's a machinist, to turn one end down to 1-1/2" to correspond to the ID of the shaft couplings I was going to have to reorder.

Placed an order for the new, correctly sized couplings. They arrived about the same time Tin gave me the modified shaft:


Tested the fit of the couplings on the shaft - perfect fit.

Got to the shop, all excited to assemble the shaft with the pillow blocks and the gear box, and went to slip one of the couplings on the drive shaft - and the coupling is TOO BIG. WHAT?!?!?!?

Caliper in hand I check - the drive shaft is 1-3/8"... UGH.

So another set of couplings to return, and the shaft back to Tin for more turning...

For the frame of the stand, I sourced a 20' piece of 3" square tube. I'd asked my supplier for a 5/16" wall thickness (yes - overkill to the extreme), and when I arrived to pick it up, they only had 1/4" wall tube. They cut it into 2 10' pieces for transport in my truck.

Good thing they didn't have 5/16" wall - I was very surprised when I went to remove the tube from the truck - 1/4" wall 3" square tube weighs 8.8 pounds per foot. 5/16" is over 11 pounds per foot.

Cut the tubing up into the various sizes required to construct the stand. Two pieces to create a mounting frame for the pillow block bearings - cut and drilled with 5/8" holes for the bolts:



Welded them together:


This was my first effort at welding this size and thickness of metal. I must say it was invigorating - the crack and sizzle of the MIG welder cranked up for 1/4" stock is mesmerizing...

Welded a 30" piece of tube to the pair I just joined together. This joint is going to be under the most stress with the engine mounted to the stand, and my Hobart 187 welder manual suggests multiple beads for maximum strength in 1/4" material using .030 solid core wire.

Welds don't look very good, but I think the penetration is acceptable:




Taking a design cue from Art & Justin's work, I wanted to cut the tubes for the front and rear "feet" to allow the casters to be attached to the top of the tube - allowing for a 3" closer-to-the-floor stance.

Frankly - this was MISERABLE work. I used a 4" hole saw in my drill press to cut the arcs. The problem is that my 17" Delta drill press has some serious design issues, and the clamping bolts and trunion pivots under the table have cracked, so the table is held in place with a couple of C-clamps and is far from rock solid. I think it took about 3 hours to cut 8 arcs in the two legs. Then I removed the remaining metal on my Milwaukee 14" cold-cut saw.

This is one of the legs before I cleaned up the work with the right-angle grinder:


The front leg is 24" long, the rear is 30" long. They're joined by a 30" piece of 3" tube.

Fabbed up the mounting shelf for the gear box and ground the welds flat to make sure the case would sit square on it's base:



For the mounting plate for the engine, I got a 24" x 24" x 5/8" thick plate for $.40/pound. It cost just over $40.00 - yep - it weighs about 100#...

I took a piece of plywood and attached it to the front of the spare transmission and used a transfer punch to mark the location for the bolts. I knocked the corners off the plywood and traced the shape onto the plate and cut it out with the torch:


I managed to make 6 cuts for the mounting plate without dropping any molten steel on my feet or burning my hands. After I was all finished and had wrapped the hoses back onto the cart I backed into the tip of the torch and burned my right arm...

My original plan was to weld the mounting plate directly to the shaft. I had Tin tap the end of the shaft for a 1/2"-13 bolt so I could bolt the shaft firmly in place before welding it. I decided instead to cut a 6" square from the leftovers from the mounting plate, drill it for a central hole and 4 mounting holes. That way I can have other uses for the stand in the future besides supporting M-100 motors.

Here's what the 6x6 plate looked like after the torching:


And after a few minutes with the grinder and a 36grit segmented disc:


5 - 1/2" holes drilled:


The rough-cut mounting plate:


Cleaned up with the grinder - this took about an hour:


When I went to drill the holes in the mounting plate, I discovered that only 2 of them were accessible on the drill press. I drilled those first, and tapped them for 1/2"-13 bolts. I discovered the quick way to tap the holes is to mount the tap handle (which has a removable T-bar and a recess for a 3/8" drive ratchet) in my Makita 18v impact driver. With the proper tapping fluid and care, I can go back and forth quickly with minimal risk of breaking the tap. Each hole took about 2 minutes to tap.

After I got the second hole tapped, I noticed something peculiar - the bolts weren't in straight. I checked the drill press table and it was not perfect, but it was very close to perpendicular to the drill bit used to drill the holes. What went wrong?

I used a piece of 5/8" plate scrap with a 1/4" hole drilled in it as a guide bushing for the other two holes in the plate which I had to drill by hand. As I was drilling the pilot hole in the plate, I noticed that the table moved when I pulled down on the quill handle to drill the hole. I confirmed my suspicions by putting the mounting plate on the drill press and checking for perpendicularity - it was off a lot more with the weight of the plate (about 75#) on the table. Those stupid busted trunions bite me in the a$$ again... (what parts are still available - press is a whopping 5 years old) are on order from Delta. When those get here - that can take 1-2 months depending on who knows what - I'll figure out what I'm going to have to do to fix the table...)

The second set of holes tapped nicely - nothing out of kilter, even with doing it all by hand.

Here's the almost complete stand - the hand wheel is missing:


A closeup of the gear box, Lovejoy couplings and the pillow block bearings:


I sourced the casters from eBay - they came with hollow king pins ready for 1/2" bolts. The wheels have annular bearings and are rated at 225# per caster - hopefully that's enough to carry the engine plus the weight of the stand... To mount them I took 1/2" carriage bolts and ground the square block off the back of the head and used nylock nuts on the caster side.



The stabilizers use a 3/8" stainless all thread - there's a 3/8" nut welded inside the tube under the top. The feet and knobs are McMaster-Carr faire.

When I ordered the second set of wrong motor couplings, I also ordered a handwheel, going from memory that the input shaft was 7/8" diameter. IT IS NOT... so that handwheel went back and I got this one instead. The input shaft is 1-3/16, and Tin was nice enough to bore it out for me. A 5/16 set screw holds it in place, and I made the handle with a 5/16" bolt through a 3/8" brass pipe nipple from which I removed the threaded ends:


Hopefully next weekend we can pull the motor - the stand is ready and I think (hope?) up to the task.

W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII

Edited by - wbrian63 on 10/14/2013 07:31:50
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S class

South Africa
955 Posts

Posted - 10/15/2013 :  07:38:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's beautiful Brian. Nice work.



116.036
116.036
116.024
116.028
116.028
107.044
202.026




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benz_head

USA
449 Posts

Posted - 10/28/2013 :  16:02:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It really is. I had a thought about all the gunk in your frontend and engine bay - it keeps rust away, so it's probably a good thing.


benz_head
#1349
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 10/29/2013 :  08:42:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yeah, the gunk inside the engine bay keeps the rust away, and the PVC under the fenders hides the rust away...



W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 10/30/2013 :  22:20:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Been a while since I've provided substantive updates, so here we go.

Two weekends ago, Tin and I pulled the motor out of the car. The process went very smoothly, given that fact that the engine/transmission assembly weighs only slightly less than a small planet.

Nothing will put the fear of gravity into a person like the sound of metal popping when the engine assembly is 3 feet in the air and still a ways from being out of the engine compartment...

I had previously removed all the external attachments to allow for quick removal of the assembly. All that remained was to disconnect the engine mounts, remove the transmission support and lift/coax the engine out of the engine compartment.

Naturally, since the bolts that attach the engine mounts to the engine are steel, and the attachment points are aluminum, the bolts wouldn't break free. However, a lot of heat applied with a MAPP gas torch to the aluminum, along with a shot of PB blaster and the bolts came free with no issues.





In order to completely clear the core support, we had to take the body off of the support blocks in the front and lower it almost all the way down to the floor.









Total start to finish was about 2 hours. No fingers were pinched, no knuckles skinned and no damage to the body or to the engine assembly.

After the engine was out, next came the task of disconnecting the engine from the transmission. I should have removed the torque converter-to-flex plate bolts while the engine was in the car, but a little effort laying on the ground with the engine lifted off the floor provided positive results.

After that, the engine needed to be attached to the yet-as-untested engine stand. That process went very smoothly until I discovered that the mounting point of the adapter plate was WAY below the center of gravity of the motor, making it VERY top heavy.

Add to that the fact that the rubber "spider" that's in the Lovejoy coupling on the stand is way too soft for the application, what resulted was a very unstable and unsafe situation.

Disconnected the engine from the stand and removed the adapter plate from the engine. Shifted the mounting point for the stand-to-adapter plate 6" upwards and that improved things immensely.

I am VERY pleased with how the stand is working out. I can rotate the motor completely upside down with no issues at all. The casters are up to the task of rolling the assembly around, and the stabilizer feet allow me to jack the frame up to prevent the weight of the motor from causing flat spots on the caster wheels or leaving dents in the wood floor of the shop.

This week, I worked on getting the car dolly under the unibody and the unibody securely attached to the dolly.

The rear "attachment" point relies on gravity to place the car. The 1-1/2" square tube is welded to the trolley frame, but only the weight of the car and the subframe bolt head keep the car in position.


In front, I made a pair of staddle stands, and bolted the car to the stands through the holes in the side of the front crossmember attachment points.


When it comes time to move the car, these saddles will make sure the car won't separate from the dolly.

I tested the dolly once fully installed and I can indeed move the car. Doesn't move easily, mostly due to the wood floor and the very small contact patch offered by the caster wheels.

One of my ideas for the dolly was the ability to raise the car up for better underneath access as well as making sill replacement easier.

At each corner of the dolly, I added a tube I purchased from a trailer supply company designed to accept a 2" square tube.

Made 4 12" legs with bottoms - jacked the front of the car up and slid the legs into place. Repeated the same at the rear, and the car is now sitting nice and high (sills are about 18" off the floor).


Tonight, I resumed cleaning by working on the items at the firewall. Central to this task was removing the fuse box to ensure there was no rust damage behind the fuse box where it attaches to the firewall.

I'm happy to report there appears to be no issue. I carefully marked each wire that was removed from the fuse block, so hopefully everything can go back together when the time comes.

(How I'll get the top 3 nuts on the fuse box studs at that point is another matter for speculation...)

More updates coming soon.

W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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etmerritt33

USA
1415 Posts

Posted - 10/31/2013 :  07:11:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am really enjoying following this project , admire your fabrication skills and wish I could be your helper. I'm learning a bunch!
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 10/31/2013 :  07:25:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks - I'll admit freely that most of this fabrication work is self-taught.

I have no idea whether what I'm doing is sufficient or overkill. I suppose it's sufficient, since nothing has failed (yet).

I was going to make the trolly out of far thicker material and was dissuaded from that path by members of another non-car-related forum.

They apparently were right (as the constructed assembly seems durable and nothing has broken - yet) - and I saved some $ in the process.

W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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cakalues

USA
781 Posts

Posted - 10/31/2013 :  12:03:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Keep up the good work. I am enjoying these posts, especially the wonderful pics

Luis
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 11/01/2013 :  08:09:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cakalues

Keep up the good work. I am enjoying these posts, especially the wonderful pics

Luis



Thanks, Luis. The pictures are part of the process. Hopefully I won't completely destroy the camera before the project is complete.

W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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