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 6.9 #521 Restoration
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 08/29/2013 :  22:26:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's some more "progress" thru 08/29/2013.

Started this evening stripping away more PVC under the driver's fender. Already revealed some rust on Tuesday, but it's surface and nothing to worry over:





Worked more, and uncovered even more rust. I'm beginning to think that it's not "if" a W116 has rust, it's "how bad is it" There were virtually no external signs of most of the rust you'll see in the following pictures, with the exception of the rocker panel, although even that didn't look as bad as it appears now.

The rust below the fuse box looks worse than it is. The metal is still solid, although I expect the entirety of the metal behind the overlapping flange is rusty. I'll investigate from above how bad the problem is and may decide to drill the spot welds out, open the flange and do some abatement, then re-weld the assembly.







Once I got the fenders off, I took the time to wiggle out each of the clips that area attached to the body through which the bolts secure the fender to the car. Each was covered in the PVC from the fender side, and the sticky black foam from the engine compartment side.

I found the quickest way to get them clean was to hold them with a pair of pliers, and gently play the flame of a MAPP gas torch over the item. The PVC will catch fire and burn, reducing much of the goop to a charred grit which is easily removed in the blasting cabinet.

I made sure not to overheat the clips lest I destroy the temper of the item. They got hot, but probably not much more than sitting in the sun with the engine of a freshly shut-off engine baking them.

I tried removing the PVC with the blasting cabinet alone, and it acts like a resist material - it's too rubbery and the glass just bounces off.

This is one of the clips from the front of the fender where the light bucket is - it's not as bad as the clips across the top of the fender, but it gives some indication of how nasty each clip was:




And here's how the clean clips appears:




I'll either paint or powder coat the clips before reinstallation.

That's all for now...

W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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ctmaher

USA
677 Posts

Posted - 08/30/2013 :  02:04:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Brian, Mercedes sells a "repair kit" for the fenders. This includes all the clips, bolts, nuts, molding clips, etc. that you would need to replace a fender. For your car it is part number 116-880-01-97 (was superceded a couple of times) and you need one kit for each fender. They show a price of about 46.00 each. Makes it real easy to get all the hardware you need and you don't have to worry about re-using rusty old fasteners. They also sell similar kits for the doors as well.

Chris

Edited by - ctmaher on 08/30/2013 02:08:21
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 08/30/2013 :  07:02:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, that's good to know. I'll add this to my next order from the Classic Center.

Regards

W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2013 :  23:32:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I took the week of 09/02 off on vacation to spend more quality time with #521. Monday was "Labor Day" so no real "work" was done. Tuesday was work of a different sort - errands, etc.

Wednesday the work continued more-or-less in earnest. I have other projects going on in the shop, so I try to complete one non-6.9 task each day, so there were delays.

I continued with the stripping of the PVC liner from the drivers fender well - here you can see most of the paint and PVC have been removed:


The upper recesses of the fender were a real pain to work with. The angles aren't good for digging the PVC out. I finally resorted to two pieces of EMT conduit, 1/2" and 3/4" OD, which I put a fine edge to one end. This works well for scraping the PVC out of the various curved recesses.




I finally got all of the PVC removed on Thursday evening and was able to start the next step to remove all vestiges of the PVC, paint and primer down to bare metal.




I got a lot more done than appears in the pictures. I got the bulk of the PVC out with my 4-1/2" electric grinder fitted with a scouring pad. Then came the small right-angle pneumatic grinder with a 2" scouring pad. That allows me to get into the little nooks and crannies that the larger grinder can't access, but not everything. When I got to the point of needing to address the under side of the crease at the front of the fender well where it meets the engine compartment, there were still too many things in my way to do a credible job.

The engine compartment is seriously grimy, and there's a very real chance that if I don't take the time to clean it up, there will be issues with fouling the primers, paint and rock chip undercoating, so I started removing the items attached to the motor and in front of the motor.

First, I started removing the left and right main wiring harnesses from where they connect to the headlamps, horns, A/C fan, etc. I purchased some string tags that I used to label each wire when it was disconnected from something. Hopefully this will allow me to get the wiring back together again.

I have no pictures for the removal of the PS pump, Alternator, A/C compressor, radiator, A/C condenser or oil filter housing - the work there was simple enough. Hardest item was the two lower bolts on the oil filter housing - my socket mounted 6mm hex wrench was too large to fit in, so those bolts came out with a standard L-shaped wrench, 1/4" turn at a time - that took a while.

Once all those items were removed, what was revealed was a study in "nasty":


To the left in the picture below, you can see the string tags I spoke of earlier. More "hack" repairs can be seen on the bolt on the lower left hand corner of the water pump. There's a nut and a couple of washers behind the hex head. I'm guessing the right-length bolt wasn't available when the pump was changed...

When I removed the A/C compressor, I discovered that the lower rear mounting bolt had 3 washers between the compressor frame and the block, and the front tensioner pulley has 3 or 4 washers between the bracket and the compressor frame. When I get everything clean, I'll remove the frame from the compressor and see if the washers, etc were really necessary to proper alignment. I have a NOS compressor, so this grimy example will not be reused.




It may be possible to see in this picture, but the fitting that feeds the bypass hose isn't really a fitting, it's a female pipe thread to compression fitting adapter - no hose barb as one would expect. Naturally, the inside of the bypass hose was cut to shreds from being clamped over the threads. I had thought that the seals had perished on the water pump - I think it may have actually been this hose leaking...




All of the brackets, etc that have been removed from the engine have had their respective bolts bagged and tagged with application, and the brackets themselves have been through the parts washer.

I've decided to pull the motor and transmission out and finish the entire front clip of the car with the proper rust abatement, priming and undercoating, along with replacing the rockers. I don't want to do this stuff twice, and getting everything clean and tidy before any paint hits the metal is the best way to ensure success later on.

More pictures to follow as I return to work on the car next week.

W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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S class

South Africa
955 Posts

Posted - 09/10/2013 :  08:23:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Someone buy this man a beer.

That looks like so much fun, I'm actually jealous. Wish I could work on my own cars instead of customer cars...



116.036
116.036
116.024
116.028
116.028
107.044
202.018
202.026




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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 09/10/2013 :  08:56:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'd actually prefer a bottle of Tylenol or Advil.

Ouch my aching shoulders/back...

Thanks for the words of encouragement.

Regards

W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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oversize

Australia
261 Posts

Posted - 09/10/2013 :  18:27:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is brilliant work and I'm sure the results will be amazing! Keep it up!

Mark


Last of the steel Mercedes

2001 Ford AU Fairmont Ghia 5L (Deep Blue)
1980 450SEL #101122 (Green Lantern)
1979 6.9 #6301 (Blue Flame)
1979 6.9 #5541 (Red Bull)
1979 6.9 #5318 (Silver Arrow)
1979 6.9 #5298 (Man o War)
1978 6.9 #4248 (Skye Blue)
1979 6.9 #3686 (Moby Dick)
1975 450SEL #28414 (Gold Nugget)
1957 Buick Roadmaster 73A (Titanic)
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 09/10/2013 :  22:10:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In preparation for removing the motor and tending to painting the entire front clip, I've been removing things from the car.

Part of the risk of an endeavor like this is being unable to reinstall the parts back to the car when the time comes, which may well be some weeks (months?) in the future. As I remove any fastener or sets of fasteners, they go into an individual zip-lock bag with a label tag containing (I hope) enough information for me to know where the fastener should be used.

For larger parts, I tie the string tag to the item.

I'm sure the service manual tells where each of the hard lines from the suspension are supposed to go - I'd just as soon as be sure.

In the case of the front level control valve, there are 4 ports, marked N, Z, B & R (if I recall correctly). After removing the valve, I tied string tags to each of the line ends with the proper reference included.




When it came time to remove the 4 lines that run over the inner fender from the valve to the right front pressure sphere and connect to lines running across the car to the suspension tank and height control valve, the easiest method was to label each end of a disconnect point A matches A, B matches B, etc.



After these lines were removed, I could start cleaning the grunge that was found on the fender and at the bottom on the frame rails


Method was the same as the wheel well side of the fender, Zep Industrial Purple cleaner, scrub brushes and patience:





It's not done, but it's a start.

The driver's side inner fender was far cleaner to start with, as I'd previously cleaned much of the gunk out when I first got the car:



But it's coming along nicely, too:


W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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oversize

Australia
261 Posts

Posted - 09/11/2013 :  09:58:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Was the car originally green or blue? I number the bags sequentially, so you can refit them in the reverse order and not have to remove something you just fitted during reassembly...

Mark


Last of the steel Mercedes

2001 Ford AU Fairmont Ghia 5L (Deep Blue)
1980 450SEL #101122 (Green Lantern)
1979 6.9 #6301 (Blue Flame)
1979 6.9 #5541 (Red Bull)
1979 6.9 #5318 (Silver Arrow)
1979 6.9 #5298 (Man o War)
1978 6.9 #4248 (Skye Blue)
1979 6.9 #3686 (Moby Dick)
1975 450SEL #28414 (Gold Nugget)
1957 Buick Roadmaster 73A (Titanic)
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etmerritt33

USA
1415 Posts

Posted - 09/11/2013 :  10:53:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just want to say thanks to Brian for so carefully documenting and sharing this work with great pics. It is a pain to take, organize and post pics especially with the descriptions. This is really educational for me and I hope to be able to use some of your techniques on some rust on my 280E.
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etmerritt33

USA
1415 Posts

Posted - 09/11/2013 :  10:56:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just want to say thanks to Brian for so carefully documenting and sharing this work with great pics. It is a pain to take, organize and post pics especially with the descriptions. This is really educational for me and I hope to be able to use some of your techniques on some rust on my 280E.
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 09/11/2013 :  11:59:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by oversize

Was the car originally green or blue? I number the bags sequentially, so you can refit them in the reverse order and not have to remove something you just fitted during reassembly...

Mark




I definitely need to categorize the fasteners in some way. I came across a clip that I'd missed for some section of the car and it took me forever to find its mates in their bag.

The car is supposed to be Cypress Green - that's the color we're going back with. Gonna be a royal PAIN...



W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 09/11/2013 :  12:02:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by etmerritt33

Just want to say thanks to Brian for so carefully documenting and sharing this work with great pics. It is a pain to take, organize and post pics especially with the descriptions. This is really educational for me and I hope to be able to use some of your techniques on some rust on my 280E.



You're quite welcome. Much of what you're seeing is literally by the seat of my pants. I'm hoping that the results are as good as I intend for them to be.


W. Brian Fogarty

'02 S55 AMG (W220)
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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Ron B

Australia
11633 Posts

Posted - 09/12/2013 :  16:15:56  Show Profile  Visit Ron B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by S class

Someone buy this man a beer.

That looks like so much fun, I'm actually jealous. Wish I could work on my own cars instead of customer cars...



116.036
116.036
116.024
116.028
116.028
107.044
202.018
202.026







I have the same problem right now....

quote:
12-14-2004, 11:49 PM #8
Tom Hanson
MBCA Member

What the heck, try to stuff a MB 6.9 liter V8 in it. What a machine that would be..
__________________
Tom Hanson
Orange County Section
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S class

South Africa
955 Posts

Posted - 09/13/2013 :  02:26:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice Brian, Zypress is a stunning colour.



116.036
116.036
116.024
116.028
116.028
107.044
202.018
202.026




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