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 Suspension air compressor
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2010 :  12:10:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rebuilding the air compressor for the air suspension on the 600 and 6.3 is not that difficult. This thread will describe the various steps. I don't know if these is a difference between the compressors for the different cars. In my EPC the compressor for the 600 has a different part number. On my 600 the pulley for the compressor has only one belt instead of two.
There is a repair kit available from MB for these compressors. The price is unbelievable, over $100. Although, is anything unbelievable when it comes to these cars? Part # 000 586 01 13.

Here is the combination of compressor and power steering pump as found on the 6.3. This set look pretty good from the outside.



After separeting the compressor from the power steering pump we will first remove the pulley. Since the nut is rusted to the shaft, I use my trusted air wrench to get it off. The best way I found to get these pulleys off is as follows: put a regular puller on the pulley, as shown. DO NOT PULL THE PULLEY OFF THIS WAY, it is made out of cast iron and will break. I put some pressure on it with the puller, not even a lot. Then lift the compressor by the pulley, about 2 inches from the work table. With a brass hammer, knock on the end of the pulley. In a few knocks the compressor will fall on the table.



Here the pulley removed. There is a lot of crud on the bearing cap, the seal ring must have been leaking.



Next we remove the four M6 bolts from the cylinder head. Between the cylinder head and the cylinder these is a valve plate. Here you see the top of the cylinder with head and plate removed. It a messy scene.



Here the valve plate, looking at the suction end. The reed suction valve can be seen.



In order to remove the cylinder we first remove the 4 M6 nuts on the cylinder base. Then we pull the cylinder off.



Here is the cylinder, looking from the bottom.



And here the piston, with four rings. With the ring tool, take out the snap ring on top of the wrist pin. The wrist pin can be pushed out by hand.



Here a view of the connecting rod and the crank shaft.


In order to get these out, we first take out the three M6 bolts that hold the bearing cap on the compressor base. By using a piece of brass, knock the crank shaft out towards the front from the other side. Here is the other side, connecting to the power steering pump.



With light blows on the other side of the crank shaft the bearing cap will move out. Here you can see the gap starting.



When the bearing is out of the compressor base, remove the snap ring the holds the connecting rod on the crank shaft bearing race. The easy way is to move the connecting rod in the highest position, and to use the right tools. Here you can see the snap ring unclipped. Now you can shove the crank shaft out with bearing cap and bearing, while the connecting rod stays in the base, and moves over the end of the crack shaft.



Here the crank shaft, still with bearing and cover on the left. The right hand side goes into a brass bushing in the compressor base.



Here the valve plate on the left and the cylinder head on the right. The valve plate is showing the pressure end.



Here the pressure end of the valve plate again, with the reed pressure valve. The posts on either end have springs on them. I have no idea how this ever worked in this condition.



Removing the bearing from the crank shaft. Since you cannot use a 3 legged puller, I had to use this two legged one. It is kind of big for this application, but it workes.


We will clean everything up, and then put the compressor back together.




1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP

aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2010 :  13:30:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Time to put the compressor back together.

Here an overview of all the parts.



And here a view of the expensive rebuild kit. That's all you get for more than $100.



First we knock the seal into the bearing cover. I put some gasket tacker on the side of the ring.



This is the cover with ring mounted. Maybe I should have painted this cover, although it is originally not as far as I remember.



This is the way the rings mount on the crank shaft. The one on the end has a chamfer, that points towards the end of the crank shaft (right in this picture).



And this is the way the clip goes onto the crank shaft. Just for show here, you have to wait until the shaft is in the housing.



The bearing gets heated on the bearing heater, and shoves easely on the crank shaft. Just in case I still give it some light blows with a brass shaft.



While holding the connecting rod in the housing, you move the shaft through the connecting rod, and also move the two rings plus clip onto the shaft. Of course we lube all sliding surfaces with motor oil.



Then the clip gets mounted on the crank shaft.



Here another view.



Now we move the bearing cap onto the bearing.



There is only one way to mount tha cap, the writing is upwards.



Of course we did not forget the sealing ring that goes around the cap.



Now we evenly turn the three bolts, while also knocking the cap with a brass shaft plus hammer.



A final light knock on the shaft and everything is seated. The shaft can be turned by hand easily.



The piston rings are not all the same. Obvious is the oil scrape ring on the bottom, but the third one down has a small ridge, that points towards the bottom of the piston. The piston ring in the background cannot be used, it is way too big.



Here the piston with rings.



After mounting the piston on the connecting rod by pushing in the wrist pin by hand, we position the bottom gasket.



The cylinder has to be positioned like this on the housing.



Laying the cylinder and compressor housing on the side, move the piston into the cylinder, while pressing the rings by hand. The cylinder and piston are lubed with motor oil.



Here the piston completely into the cylinder.



The M6 nuts on the bottom of the cylinder. You might have to leave the cylinder a little bit away from the housing in order to get the nuts on the studs.



Now the cylinder is mounted.



Detail of the valve plate. Here the seats of the suction valve.



Now the suction reed valve is in place.



And now the gasket in in postion.



The valve plate on top of the cylinder. Position the gasket through the holes.



On the other side of the valve plate the seat of the pressure valve.



The reed valve in place.



Spring plate and springs in position.



The spring plate has a bow, which mounts in this position.



Pressure end of the spring plate with reed valve.



And finally the head on the cylinder. I did not have the right plated bolts in stock, so temporarely I used unplated bolts. You can turn the shaft by hand using the nut on the end.


1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP
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Ron B

Australia
11633 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2010 :  19:57:07  Show Profile  Visit Ron B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
There are four basc types of Compressor,W100, 2 for W109 and W112 . Each are the same capacity but have different size pulleys . The W109 M116 compressor mounts to the sump and doesn't have the rear drive. Not too many other major differences otherwise. It really illustrates the need for regular oil changes too when I see those shots of the inside.

quote:
12-14-2004, 11:49 PM #8
Tom Hanson
MBCA Member

What the heck, try to stuff a MB 6.9 liter V8 in it. What a machine that would be..
__________________
Tom Hanson
Orange County Section
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Art Love

Australia
6239 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2010 :  00:22:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would like to warn against the use of any type of pulley puller on the cast iron pulley of this unit. I have personally seen 3 pulleys broken. It is next to impossible to apply any standard pulley puller without one of the arms being against that paper thin machined edge which will crack with the slightest stress. The correct method of dislodging the pulley in my opinion is to support the pulley with your hand just above the workbench and strike the center shaft.

The design of this pulley fascinates me. The whole set up is balanced in a very strange way. The counterweight is on the same side as the machined edge. I showed it to an engineer once and he was also fascinated.
Art
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2010 :  01:51:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Art,

I do not disagree. As I stated in the description, DO NOT USE THE PULLER etc. I basically did what you suggested, hold the pulley and strike the center shaft. I use the puller to put the slightest amount of pressure on the pulley, and hit the puller bolt, which is basically the same as hitting the center shaft. After getting the puller finger tight, I might add another half a tunrn of pressure.

Again, I basically agree with you, just made the job a little easier with some pressure on the pulley.
I have removed at least three other pulleys of these compressors this way and never cracked one. However, I dropped one one the floor years ago and that took a big chunk out of the pulley.

1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP
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Kai McRae

Australia
390 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2010 :  21:11:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I find these pictorial posts fascinating. They will be such a resource for us all.
Thanks again for all your efforts!

1971 6.3 - #5417 -
(LPG)
1982 230E - W123 (M102)

Edited by - Kai McRae on 01/26/2010 21:12:14
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2010 :  00:06:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Kai.

Try to make it to the meet this year, the dollar is still low and you will have a good time!

1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP
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Kai McRae

Australia
390 Posts

Posted - 04/14/2011 :  07:30:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey, my repair kit (000 586 01 13) came with a selection of 3 gaskets for the crankcase-barrell junction.

Thin, medium and thick.

I assume the selection is to allow for milled surfaces? or is it related to various compressions?

Mine has not been milled.

Albert, which did you use?

Anyone else have experience with this?


1971 6.3 - #5417 -
(LPG)
1982 230E - W123 (M102)
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juan

USA
106 Posts

Posted - 04/30/2011 :  23:30:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How about the rings? Where did you find them?

Juan
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juan

USA
106 Posts

Posted - 05/07/2011 :  21:51:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Is it ok to use the old rings? Will they seat again?

Juan
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Ron B

Australia
11633 Posts

Posted - 05/08/2011 :  17:30:40  Show Profile  Visit Ron B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I am sure mercedes stock the rings Juan, but if there is a small engine shop near you they may the correct sizes. Some thing like a lawn mower or chain saw engine?.
As long as the ring gap isn't too large you should be able to reuse the old rings.


quote:
12-14-2004, 11:49 PM #8
Tom Hanson
MBCA Member

What the heck, try to stuff a MB 6.9 liter V8 in it. What a machine that would be..
__________________
Tom Hanson
Orange County Section
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juan

USA
106 Posts

Posted - 05/11/2011 :  06:43:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Ron!

Juan
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tjryan

USA
25 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2011 :  10:04:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Isn't there some seal between the compressor and the power steering pump? Anybody got pic's of what this looks like/tips for replacement?
Thanks
Tim

TimRyan
71 300sel6.3
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Chris Johnson

USA
3751 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2011 :  13:38:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Tim,

There is an O-ring on the nose of the PS pump that slides into the rear of the air compressor that provides a seal to the outside world. Is this the one you are refering to?

Chris Johnson
If you aren't constantly impressed with your car, then it needs fixing.
100.012-12-000790
100.012-12-000867
www.300SE.org
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Ron B

Australia
11633 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2011 :  21:20:07  Show Profile  Visit Ron B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
yes there is,you can buy them anywhere. it's a dual lip seal with two lips so dont fit a single lip seal in there because it will work fro a few months then fail.
Here similar seal in Alberts pic above.This is the outer shaft seal BTW.


quote:
12-14-2004, 11:49 PM #8
Tom Hanson
MBCA Member

What the heck, try to stuff a MB 6.9 liter V8 in it. What a machine that would be..
__________________
Tom Hanson
Orange County Section

Edited by - Ron B on 05/17/2011 21:20:59
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Chris Johnson

USA
3751 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2011 :  22:23:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is not so. There is no shaft seal on the rear of the pump. In fact, there is a hole through the body of the pump to the rear side to provide some mist lubrication to the shaft coupling between the air compressor and the PS pump.

If there is leaking at the joint between the air compressor and the PS pump, it is the O-ring on the nose of the PS pump.

Chris Johnson
If you aren't constantly impressed with your car, then it needs fixing.
100.012-12-000790
100.012-12-000867
www.300SE.org
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