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 6.3
 The rebuild starts !
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Art Love

Australia
6226 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2013 :  17:39:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The rubberized sheeting that goes on the floors can be bought locally from upholstery suppliers or you can buy the original material from Tom Hanson at the Classic Center in Irvine California. It comes in sheets and usually has preapplied adhesive on one surface. You can also buy the original bitumen/fiber sound deadener sheeting that goes in the doors, on the firewall interior and behind the rear seat and other places in sheets of different thickness from Tom as well as new boot side panels where the fuel tank breather attaches. The boot side panel is pre-cut as are the door anti-squeak pads, the rest is bought by the metre and is not very expensive. About the only things you can't get are the pre-cut bitumen/fiber pads that go on the firewall in the engine bay.
Art
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Ron B

Australia
11612 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2013 :  17:49:02  Show Profile  Visit Ron B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The things you need are bostic self adhesive sound deadning pads. you need enough to to do the whole floor from the front foot qwells (about 6" up the sloping part ) ,right through to the rear foot wells and under the rear seat.
Bostik 8104 SDS Boscoseal 16
Description; High performance, bitumen ‘Blue backed’, bitumen- Self-adhesive rubberised
sound deadening pads,


quote:
12-14-2004, 11:49 PM #8
Tom Hanson
MBCA Member

What the heck, try to stuff a MB 6.9 liter V8 in it. What a machine that would be..
__________________
Tom Hanson
Orange County Section
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oversize

Australia
261 Posts

Posted - 07/09/2013 :  07:14:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The restoration on this car is just amazing! I'm not worthy! LOL!

Mark


Last of the steel Mercedes

2001 Ford AU Fairmont Ghia 5L (Deep Blue)
1980 450SEL #101122 (Green Lantern)
1979 6.9 #6301 (Blue Flame)
1979 6.9 #5541 (Red Bull)
1979 6.9 #5318 (Silver Arrow)
1979 6.9 #5298 (Man o War)
1978 6.9 #4248 (Skye Blue)
1979 6.9 #3686 (Moby Dick)
1975 450SEL #28414 (Gold Nugget)
1957 Buick Roadmaster 73A (Titanic)
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Art Love

Australia
6226 Posts

Posted - 07/09/2013 :  08:15:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The article on the first firing up of the rebuilt motor should be in our next Lode Star. I have permission for it to be reproduced from the UK M-B Club Gazette and Eric has the contact with the editor there to get it when he is ready.
Art
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benz_head

USA
449 Posts

Posted - 10/18/2013 :  13:27:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mr. Tigger,
Why did you perforate the metal that you used to reinforce the sills?
This is a brilliant idea, especially for a 6.3. The engine's torque can twist the frame rails and chassis!

Thanks,

benz_head
#1349
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Art Love

Australia
6226 Posts

Posted - 10/18/2013 :  18:22:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Peter,

Paul is unlikely to answer. This is an old thread that I have made "sticky" to keep it near the top of the Forum and he will have moved on to other projects. The obvious answer is to save weight.

Art
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RichardH

United Kingdom
1 Posts

Posted - 10/26/2013 :  03:29:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Hi,
I'm the owner of this 6.3. The holes in the gusset plate are to strengthen the sill section vertically should someone try to jack the car up in places other than the jacking points. The holes are flared to create a strong rigid panel. You can see the thickness of the flare on the inside face of the gusset plate. The two small holes at the bottom do not have flares as they act as drain holes.

This project is still ongoing but has concentrated on the engine and gearbox commissioning on a test rig as described in Art's comment about the up and coming article in Lode Star.

On another note, the sound deadening sheets were purchased from a UK trade supplier. Most sound deadening sheets available here in the UK on a retail basis are sold in small sizes (500 x 500mm). This material comes in 1500 x 1000mm which is ideal for the car. If anybody needs contact details please let me know. They also do the fibreglass heat reflective sheeting in the same size at a fraction of the MB price.




quote:
Originally posted by benz_head

Mr. Tigger,
Why did you perforate the metal that you used to reinforce the sills?
This is a brilliant idea, especially for a 6.3. The engine's torque can twist the frame rails and chassis!

Thanks,

benz_head
#1349

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arcijack

USA
475 Posts

Posted - 03/14/2016 :  23:19:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
in picture 13 where Mr Tigger add a band to the new floor pans did he butt weld or lap weld the band to the new floor, the reason i am asking, the old car i purchase has pretty good floor pans and i want to cut the rust out and weld up, but the pans are paper thin seems as but welding these things would be a chore.
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wbrian63

USA
900 Posts

Posted - 03/15/2016 :  08:37:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This thread is ages old - not sure you'll get a reply from pj, so I'll try to answer.

In a w116 chassis, the extra band that extends the floor pan from SE to SEL is lapped in and spot-welded. I expect the same is true in a W108/W109 car.

On my restoration, where I'm replacing metal, I go back with the same method as the factory used.

A butt welded panel patch will always be better at resisting rust in the future because there's no gap for moisture to penetrate.

That being said, butt welding the thin material used for much of the chassis on a W116 can be a complete PITA. The non-structural material on my W116 is .035 thick. If there is ANY rust lurking at the weld point, the underlying metal will just evaporate when you hit it with the arc. Additionally, in many areas where the panels were stamped during production, the metal is very thin because it gets stretched as it's pulled over the stamping dies. That can cause problems with blow-through as well. Butt welding is a slow and tedious process, but if done properly is all but invisible, even before any paint or filler is used.

It will be easier to lap a patch over existing material and use plug welds to secure. Just be sure to paint the lapped sections before welding. I'm using a 2-part epoxy primer that I mix in very small batches (I use a large syringe to make sure I've got the proper 2:1 ratio of paint to catalyst). Paint both pieces, then I drill a series of 1/4" holes in the piece to be lapped over the existing part. Once the patch is in place, I use a 4-flute carbide end-mill in a drill to remove the paint through the drilled holes to create a good place to weld.

The epoxy burns back a bit around the welds, but not as much as you'd expect. If you want to help resist rust after the weld, you can mix some more epoxy primer and slather it around the welded areas and let it migrate into the gaps between the panels - capillary action at work.

Once patched, a quality seam sealer on top and bottom should provide as good a rust-resistant seam as can be had.

W. Brian Fogarty

'07 Lexus LS460L
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #521
'02 S55 AMG (W220) - sold
'92 300SE (W140) - sold
'76 450SEL 6.9 Euro #1164 - parted & gone

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people, and most of them seemed to come from Texas..." Casino Royale, Chapter VII
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arcijack

USA
475 Posts

Posted - 03/15/2016 :  09:33:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks Brian
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