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Chris Johnson

USA
3751 Posts

Posted - 10/27/2009 :  13:32:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The book means to keep the oil level below the full mark when the transmission is cold so that when the metal components expand there will be room to force the oil level higher without exceeding the top mark.

The engine would have to have serious overheating problems before that would have an adverse effect on the trans oil level, and if it were that bad you wouldn't be driving the car.



Chris Johnson
If you aren't constantly impressed with your car, then it needs fixing.
100.012-12-000790
100.012-12-000867
www.300SE.org
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Ron B

Australia
11612 Posts

Posted - 10/27/2009 :  16:34:38  Show Profile  Visit Ron B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The most effective way to check the fluid level is to go for a drive of at least 5 miles so the trans itself gets hot.
Check the fluid with the car in drive and idling ( HANDBRAKE ON AND SOMEONE APPLYING THE BRAKE!) .A safe reading should be just under the full mark.
The main reason for allowing plenty of fluid space is because excess fluid gets whipped into foam by the trans and causes wear,noise and bad shifting.
If the reading on the stick shows a lot of extra fluid Above the level mark,drain some off and let the car sit for at least 5 minutes then repeat the above proceedure . You need to let the fluid settle to release some of the air bubbles and the drive is ensure all air has been pushed from the valve body.

quote:
12-14-2004, 11:49 PM #8
Tom Hanson
MBCA Member

What the heck, try to stuff a MB 6.9 liter V8 in it. What a machine that would be..
__________________
Tom Hanson
Orange County Section

Edited by - paul-NL on 08/29/2017 20:44:52
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juan

USA
106 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2009 :  20:53:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK I changed to Dexron-Mercon III fluid on the 6.3. I wander if I shuld do the same on the 3.5. Thanks.

Juan
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Ron B

Australia
11612 Posts

Posted - 11/16/2009 :  16:57:17  Show Profile  Visit Ron B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The 3.5 has different design trans but it still uses Dexron 3 so by all means use the same fluid.

quote:
12-14-2004, 11:49 PM #8
Tom Hanson
MBCA Member

What the heck, try to stuff a MB 6.9 liter V8 in it. What a machine that would be..
__________________
Tom Hanson
Orange County Section

Edited by - paul-NL on 08/29/2017 20:45:12
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juan

USA
106 Posts

Posted - 11/17/2009 :  19:48:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Will do that. Thanks!

Juan
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/05/2010 :  17:02:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Finally back on this project. Most transmission parts got cleaned, including the case.So I started to put the thing back together. I will do a picture story on how that went.

First thing on my list was the main gear assembly. In order to get that together, you first have to put clutch packs K1 and K2 together. Here we go:


All parts that go into clutch pack K1. In the center the drum, which also serves as the drum for brake band B3. To the left 6 new clutch plates, #112 272 02 25. On the bottom the outer seal, #316 272 08 92. At the time I took this picture I forgot the inner seal, #115 272 14 92. On top the 24 springs, the retaining clip and the spring retainer, below that the K1 piston, and on the right the steel clutch plates. The line up is from the piston side on:
6 1 5 3 5 3 5 3 5 3 5 3 5 2, where
1: 1.3 mm 112 272 02 26
2: 2.4 mm 100 272 01 26
3: 3.5 mm 112 272 05 26
5: 112 272 02 25 clutch plate
6: 0.6mm 112 272 14 62





First we mount the lip seal on the outside of the piston. Here you can see the result. Be sure the lip points down to the back of the clutch pack, as you can see here!





Then we mount the other seal on the part of the drum, over which the piston slides. Again, lip towards the back! This picture was supposed to show this seal, but is not very clear.





Now, in order to get the lip seal inside the bottom cylinder, you have to compress it into the walls. The best way to do this is to have another cylinder, of which the bottom is the same size as the cylinder part of the K1 drum, and the top is wider. At one point MB had a special tool for that, 116 589 02 61. NLA... So, I had one made, as you can see here. BTW, the red goo is specially made for assembling transmissions, it dissolves in the fluid later on. I use it for all sliding surfaces, bearings, gears, etc.





Here piston and drum, you can see the inside seal (black) inside the drum:





Here the drum with the tool inserted. Again, top of tool larger diameter, bottom the same as the drum. So the lip seal squeezes into the bottom part. Some people will try thin wire, or ground saw blades, etc. However, if you nick or ruin lip seal, you will not know until the whole thing is together.





Here the drum with tool, and with piston seated at the bottom:





Now the tool removed, and the piston is mounted:





Springs (24) are put into their holes:





Spring retainer on top of springs:





Spring compressor with adapter ring (see earlier in this thread) on top of spring pack:





Springs compressed, see recess for retainer clip on top of spring retainer:





retainer clip in place:





Compressor removed, everything seems OK:





In the mean time, the six lined plates were soaking in ATF, since they are new:





First plates mounted, steel one visible:





Now a lined plate. You have to try to line up these plates, so insertion of the inner splines is easier.





Now we need to insert the input shaft, which also has the splined part that inserts into the clutches. I also needed to put the ball valve back into the input shaft. This valve prevents the fluid clutch from draining. Here are the parts, including the adapted tool for mouting. The internal clip is mounted low into the shaft, so you need special pliers.





Here the bottom of the input shaft, with ball and spring inserted, but no clip yet. The gear you see is the sun gear of the first planetary gear set, mounted to the input shaft.





On the input shaft itself is a steel seal, here is the new one.





This seal has hooks, as you can see here.





We also need to mount the bearing for the front of the input shaft, since you cannot get to this later. It will be mounted against the main pump later. Since there is some grease on it, it will not fall down. The "gear" you see is actually the splined parts that goes inside the clutches.





Now we are sliding the shaft into the clutch pack. If the clutches are not lined up, this will be difficult. I mount the drum on an adapter in a large vise, so the input shaft can stick out on the bottom. Here you see a failed attempt, the shaft is laying on one of the lower clutch plates. You almost need to feel 6 distinct passes when the shaft slides in the clutches.





Here you see why there was a failure, the lowest plate is out of alignment. With a pick we re-align the plates.





Success, the K1 clutch is finished. Notice the spline is almost flush with the clutches. On top the sun gear on the input shaft.






I forgot to mention that you will have to messure the play of the clutch pack. You do this by measuring the distance from the top of the drum to the pack with a depth gage. It has to be 10.8-11.4mm, mine was 11.9mm. So I had to add another 0.6mm steel plate to get there.

1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP


Edited by - paul-NL on 08/31/2017 16:18:15
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Chris Johnson

USA
3751 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2010 :  10:33:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Albert,

I'm glad to see you've had a chance to get back to the cars, and I love the highly detailed posts you are taking the time to make.

Chris Johnson
If you aren't constantly impressed with your car, then it needs fixing.
100.012-12-000790
100.012-12-000867
www.300SE.org
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2010 :  15:19:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the remarks, Chris...

Now on to the next subject, the K2 clutch. This is the clutch that locks up the rear planetary gear set in 4th gear. It also contains the one way clutch, that is used in reverse and first gear.

To make everything more clear, here is a picture of the inside of the K4B 050 transmission. In the previous posting we assembled the input shaft and K1, which is also the drum for brake band B3, the reverse brake band. In this post we will assemble clucth K2, which is also the drum for brake band B2.
Notice the following:
-The input shaft is connected to sun gear S1, and one side of clutch K1.
-The planet gears P1 are connected to the other side of clutch K1, drum of brake band B3, ring gear R2, and the intermediate shaft.
-Ring gear R3 is connected to planet gears P2, and through the hollow shaft to the one way clutch.
-Sun gear S2 is connected to drum of brake band B1.
-The other side of the intermediate shaft is connected to clutch K2 and ring gear R3.
-Planet gears P3 are connected to the output shaft.
-Sun gear S3 is connected to the drum of brake band B2, to the other side of clutch K2, and to the other side of the one way clutch.





Here the line up of all parts used in clutch K2. On the left the lined plates, same parts as used in K1, #112 272 02 25. Bottom left the springs (28 of them) and retainer clip, in the middle from top to bottom: K2 piston, piston lip seals #109 272 01 92 and #115 272 14 92, and the piston housing. On the right the steel plates.
Line up from piston side: 6 3 5 4 5 4 5 4 5 4
3: 3.5mm 112 272 05 26
4: 5.5mm 100 272 00 26
5: lined plates 112 272 02 25
6: 0.6mm 112 272 14 62





The lip seal mounted on the piston, again with the lip pointed towards the bottom of the housing. (Lip pointing up in picture).





Here the inner lip seal, mounted on the piston housing. Again the lip points down. The hole you see is one of the bores for the fluid, that is supplied through a hollow shaft on the center bearing support.





Because of the construction of these parts you cannot use a special tool like we used on K1. However, since you can get to the seal, the special tool is a ballpoint, which you use to push the seal in at the same time applying pressure to the piston. On top the piston, on the bottom the housing.





28 springs in position... In the background the inevitable can of beer.





The part that retains the springs is also the outside housing of the one way clutch.





Here the springs compressed with the same spring compressor as used for K1. This is the compressor designed for the 722.3 clutch packs. I did not make an adapter ring, since you can easily use the setup as shown.





Looking down at the piston in housing. The needle bearing goes around a shaft connected to the center bearing support. The spline has a groove for the retaining clip. This spline is used for connection to the outside housing of the one way clutch.





A side view. The notched part at the bottom is the piston housing. The notches are used to lock the housing into the drum for brake band B2, used in first, second and third gear. Inside the piston with the spring holes, on top the outside housing of the one way clutch.





The parts for the one way clutch. The two brass bearing rings are the upper and lower bearings for the rollers, the ring on the bottom left is the inside of the one way clutch, in which the hollow shaft sticks, and on the bottom right the roller cage with rollers. These rollers are bone shaped, which causes the one way effect.





First we mount the bottom bearing:





Then we stick the roller cage into the housing, then the middle part. Here you can see how it works: the bone shaped rollers are under an angle mounted between the inner and outer surfaces. Going clock wise is impossible, counter clock wise is easy. In this case a picture is worth a thousand words...





After mounting the top bearing plate and inserting the clip. You should be able to turn the inside part counter clock wise only.





THis is the drum for brake band B2, in which clutch pack K2 resides. The splines section on top is for K2, and the smaller section at the bottom houses the rear planetary gear set. Clutch plates will lay on the big snap ring in the middle of the drum. The notches on top are for connecting the K2 piston housing, which we just assembled.





Here the same drum, with the first clutch plate inserted. This is the last number '4' in the clutch plate line up, since the piston will come from the top!





And the first lined plate (number '5' in the clutch plate line up).






After stacking all plates we check for play, which has to be around 16 mm. Again, I had to add a 0.6mm plate.




1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP

Edited by - paul-NL on 08/30/2017 22:08:46
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/06/2010 :  16:31:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Now we are ready to stick the gear train together.

We start with the intermediate shaft. The spline on top will stick later into the planet carrier of the first planetary gear set. The large spline on the bottom is the section that sticks into the lined plates of the K2 clutch. The notches at the bottom are connecting the intermediate shaft to ring gear S3 of the rear planetary gear set, which you see on the left. Inside the ring gear on towards the top you see the grooves for the snap ring and lock that will hold the intermediate shaft.





You will have to mount the round ring first in the top groove, then insert the notched part of the intermediate shaft, and then use the rectangular lock on the other side. Here the parts mounted together.





Here a detail of the above. You can see the round ring, starting in the fourth tooth from the right.





And a detail of the other side. Now you can see the rectangular lock.





The drum for brake band K2 is mounted on the vise, clutch plates upwards. The intermediate shaft with ring gear R3 is stuck into position, but still laying ON the clutch plates. Some wiggling is required again, in order to get the big spline into the lined clutch plates. You basically have to feel 4 distinct moves for each lined clutch plate to engage. Again, lining up these plates beforehand is very helpful.





Here the result. What you see is again the drum of brake band B2. Inside the ring gear R3 (rear planetary gear set) connected to the intermediate shaft. Under this ring gear (invisible) is the clutch pack K2 and the one way clutch. Towards the top of the drum the rectangular lock that will hold the output shaft later.





Here is the output shaft, connected to the planet gears P3 of the rear planetary gear set. The top spline holds the flange for the drive shaft and the output bearing, the bottom spline holds the center grooved bearing, the parking lock ring and drives the governor and secondary pumps. Typical for the K4B 050 transmission is the use of double planet gears, in order to handle the enormous M100 torque.





Here is the output shaft again, together with the sun gear S3 of the rear planetary gear set. Notice the radial and axial needle bearings in the bottom part of the input shaft. Also, as mentioned before, use the special 'tranny grease' (what a word).





This is the way to check for play in this section. You can adjust the play by adding or removing thin washers behind the axial needle bearing. In my case it was fine.





Here a side view of the output shaft and the sun gear S3 together.





Now we stick the output shaft with sun gear S3 into the drum of brake band B2. This completes the rear planetary gear set. We mount another rectangular lock, as can be seen right under the notches on top of the drum. In the vise is the intermediate shaft, on top the output shaft.





On the center bearing carrier plate we mount two new steel seals on the shaft. Here a close up of this. Visible are from top to bottom: an small groove for the seal, a larger groove for fluid supply, and another small groove for the second seal. The large cutout in the larger groove is the fluid supply hole. The fluid is supplied through a tube that sticks into the center bearing carrier plate.





Here a close up of the the steel seals mounted. The ends of this seal hook into each other, as can be seen in the top groove.





The drum for brake band B2 is flipped 180 degrees in the vise, now the output shaft points down and the intermediate shaft points up. The center bearing carrier plate is mounted into the drum. Pointing up you see the end of the intermediate shaft, and the radial and axial needle bearings for drum B2. Drum B2 also contains the sun gear S2 for the center planetary gear set.





This concludes the section of the gear set below (or after) the center bearing carrier.




1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP

Edited by - paul-NL on 08/31/2017 10:13:56
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2010 :  11:54:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Now we will assemble the front part of the gear train. This consists of the drums for B1 and B3 brake bands and the central and front planetary gear sets.

First we will assemble the ring gear R2 of the central planetary gear set. Here a picture of the parts. Left the connector, right the ring gear R2. The connector will connect the ring gear R2 to the planet gears P1 of the front planetary gear set.





Ring gear R2 has two grooves: one round groove and a rectangular groove. These grooves will accomodate rings, which will lock up the connector. Here a detail.





We first move the connector into the ring gear, as shown.





Then we mount the round ring into the round groove.





Next we mount the rectangular lock ring into the rectangular groove. This will fix the connector plate into the ring gear. Here a detail.





Here we see the mounted ring gear R2 on the right. On the left the planet gears P2 from the central planetary gear set. These are mounted to a carrier, which also is connected to the hollow shaft. The hollow shaft will connect the planet gears P2 to the inside of the one way clutch.





Here another view of the couple.





Now we move the ring gear R2 over the planet gears P2. It just kind of floats there, until we connect something to the connector. Here you see the result. Take a good look at the holes in the connector. There are three threaded holes, at 12:00, 04:00 and 08:00. The other three sets of holes are important later on...





Next part we need is the ring gear R1 of the front planetary gear set. Here is is, on the left. The notches on the bottom will stick into the notches in the planet gear carrier P2, which you see on the right.





Here you see the ring gear R1 stuck into the planet gear carrier P2. On the left bottom a spacer ring, on the top the lock. The spacer ring has three notches on one side, asymmetrical. There is a notch at each quarter of the ring, except for one. Let's say the notches are at 03:00, 06:00 and 09:00. There is nothing at 12:00.





First we stick in the spacer ring, notches up, onto the mounted ring gear R1. Then we put the rectangular lock ring into the groove. Here the detail:





We bend a new wire lock into the shape in this picture:





Now we move the spacer ring with the notches in such a way that the 12:00 position (no notch) is right under the opening in the mounted rectangular lock ring. We then use the wire lock, stuff the square part we bend into it into the opening of the lock ring, and stuff the rest of the wire lock in between the lock ring and the ring gear R1. At the position of the notches, we stuff the ring into these. This secures the wire lock in place.





The next part we need is the planets gears P1 carrier of the front planetary gear set. Here you see one side of it:





And here the other side. The six shafts that hold the P1 planet gears stick a few mm's out of the carrier plate. There are holes in the connector plate of ring gear R2, in which these shafts stick. These are the holes we talked about a few pics up.





Now we move the P1 planet gear carrier onto the connector plate of R2, lock the 6 shaft protrusions into the six corresponding holes, smear a tiny bit of LockTite onto the three Allen bolts, and bolt the carrier to the connector plate. Torque at 30 Nm...





The final part we need is the drum for brake band B1, connected to sun gear S2. Here it is...





Now we have to mount this drum onto the rest of our work. Here you see the drum B1 on the left, and the front plus center planetary gear sets on the right. Visible are the planet gears P2 and the hollow shaft. On the far top right we see the notches of planet gear carrier P1, which we just bolted on.





Here the result. This is the drum for brake band B1, the hollow shaft, and the front plus center planetary gear sets. The only thing missing on the gear sets is sun gear S1, which we will see shortly.





Here looking from the other side. You are looking at the front planetary gear set, minus its sun gear S1.





And here is that missing sun gear S1. It is mounted to clutch assembly K1, which we put together earlier. So on the left our B1 drum, with front and center planetary gear sets, and on the right drum B3, with clutch K1 and sun gear S1. On the other and is the input shaft. All we do now is stick these together, and secure the assembly with a lock ring, that goes to a groove inside drum B3. Unfortunately I forgot to take a picture of this.





In the mean time, our rear gear train assembly plus center bearing carrier plate are still in the vise:





We now take the front part we just assembled, and stick this with the hollow shaft down into the rear assembly in the vise.
Since the whole thing is a little top heavy now, I took it all out and layed the complete gear train on the table.
Here it is, from left to right: input shaft, drum B3, drum B1, center bearing carrier plate, drum B2 and output shaft.





This concludes the assembly of the gear train. I have put it away in a clean plastic bag into a RubberMaid container. We will need it again when we are ready to put it into the housing.

Next: main pump, secondary pumps, governor, housing, brake band pistons, vacuum regulator, valve body...

1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP

Edited by - paul-NL on 08/31/2017 10:42:05
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juan

USA
106 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2010 :  13:15:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow wow. Such detail with so many good shots!!! Will say it again: I wish I had seen all of this a few months back when I had to rebuild my transmission. Manual are OK but this is the best!

Thanks!!!

Juan
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2010 :  12:22:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Had some time this weekend, so up to the next step. That would be the transmission pumps, and first of all the primary (or main) pump.
Here we go:

The parts for the main pump. Here we see on top the the intermediate plate, middle left the drive gear, middle right the driven (or ring) gear, and on the bottom right the pump housing.





The primary pump housing mounts into the front transmission cover, which we see here. The areas around the circumference are where the gasket goes later, and are cleaned with very fine steel wool.





Here the other side of the cover, the outside.





There are some new parts that go into the primary pump. Shown are the main gasket between the front cover and transmission housing, the rubber O-ring that goes around the pump housing, the radial sealing ring for the fluid coupler shaft, two steel sealing rings for the K1 clutch and two aluminum crush washers.





These parts all come from a separate gasket kit, #100 270 23 01.





First thing is to drive the radial sealing ring into the pump housing. Use a fitting seal driver (as shown), and drive the seal into the housing. I always put a tiny film of gasket sealant around the metal OD of the sealing ring.





Drive the seal to the point where the radius of the front metal part of the ring just sticks out of the housing (as per fig 27-14/7). DO NOT GO THE WHOLE WAY IN!





Then mount the O-ring into the groove around the pump housing. When it's in, be sure it is not twisted and coat with a tiny film of tranny grease.





This is a close up of the side of the driven (ring) gear for the primary pump. Note the chamfer on the left. This chamfer goes towards the bottom of the housing, pointing towards the engine.





Here are the gears into the pump housing. The chamfer of the large gear is down wards in this picture. Also note that the driven (smaller) gear has the cut outs for the fluid coupler shaft pointed towards the transmission. The gears should look flush with the pump housing like in this picture. Be sure to use tranny grease between both gears and gears and housing. This will also help when first rotating the pump, the grease will "prime" the pump and start pumping action faster.





Put the intermediate plate into the front cover, and coat one side with grease. You have to be sure the cut outs are into the right position, the square hole in the bottom should correspond with the square hole in the cover. I put two bolts through the cover to get things started. Then use all four bolts to pull the pump housing into the cover evenly. Torque to 20Nm.





Now mount the two steel oil sealing rings for clutch K1 onto the shaft that's part of the cover. Here one is in it's groove (bottom), the other one is still laying on top.





The end result, inside of the front transmission cover. The front and input shaft of the gear set will later be supported by the center shaft.





And here the front of the cover. Later you will see this in the bell housing.





And now we bag the front cover with pump in a plastic bag, and store for final assembly of the transmission.





1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP

Edited by - paul-NL on 08/31/2017 11:02:39
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2010 :  13:23:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Time for the secondary pumps. These smaller gear pumps are mounted in the rear housing of the transmission. They are mounted together with the governor on a center bearing cover, that also contains the drive gears for pumps and governor. You can see here how. This is a picture of the transmission with the rear cover removed. In the lower center the output shaft of the transmission. Above that, mounted with 8 bolts, is the aluminum bearing cover. It contains the drive shaft for the pumps and governor, you see the gear right above the output shaft. The aluminum part with the 4 small cylinders (3 visible) on the left is the governor. The blackish cast iron housing on the right contains the secondary pumps.





Some more about the secondary pumps. The smaller one of the two is the governor pump, and helps with maintaining oil pressure to the governor at higher car speeds.
The larger one is really called the secondary pump. It as also found on many other early transmissions. It is a backup pump for the main pump, and its purpose is the ability to push start the car. The idea is as follows: when you have a dead battery (or a low one, that's unable to turn the starter) you can push the car (or pull it with another one) and get the engine running. That's easy with a manual transmission.
Now with an automatic transmission you are completely dependant on fluid pressure. Since the main (primary) pump is coupled to the engine, there is no pressure. But when you push the car, with the transmission in Neutral, the transmission output shaft starts to turn (through the car's differential). And so the secondary pump, which is driven by the transmission output shaft, also starts to turn, and generates fluid pressure. With enough car pushing speed, enough pressure builds up to get the clutches / brake bands going. Now you pull the transmission into second gear (D2) and the right clutches / brake bands are activated, and so the engine starts to turn and hopefully fires up.
This scenario was used up till the 722.3 transmissions, mounted into the 126 cars. However, later models of this series had the secondary pumps omitted, because no one ever used them.
And somehow I find it hard to believe any one ever push started a 600...


Anyway, time to assemble these pumps. Here are the parts, all nice and clean. Top left the secondary pump housing and right the governor pump housing, top center the intermediate plate. Middle left to right: govenor pump driving gear, secondary pump driven gear, governor pump driven gear and secondary pump driving gear. On the bottom the mounting bolts, and on the bottom right the drive bushing that connects the pumps to the drive shaft.





There are some parts that cannot be removed, like this one way ball valve on the intermediate plate. Be sure it is clean and free, you should hear it move when you shake the plate.






There is also a piston with spring on the housing, that cannot be removed. Be sure it's clean and can be moved.





The secondary pump housing.





And the governor pump gears. Left the driven gear, right the driving gear. The notch on the latter's ID is for the drive shaft.





The secondary pump gears. Left the driven gear, right the driving gear. There is a ball on the shaft of the right gear (unfortunately not visable) that goes into the notch of the governor pump driving gear.




With ample grease (remember the priming action) we mount the two governor gears into the govenor pump housing. The shaft on the left is part of the housing. The driven gear goes over this shaft, and the driving gear (with notch) is on the right.





Place the intermediate plate onto the governor pump housing.





Now place the secondary pump gears. The left one is the driven gear, and goes over the shaft mounted into the governor pump housing. The right gear is the secondary pump driving gear, and is the only gear mounted on a shaft. This shaft you see on the right. It has a ball mounted on one side which sticks into the govenor pump driving gear below it. Wiggle the shaft to be sure the ball is in the notch.





Now mount the secondary pump housing, and secure the assembly with one cheese head screw. here the back of the assembly.





Here a top view of the assembly: on top the secondary pump housing, the drive shaft sticks out of it. On the bottom the governor pump housing.





And here a view of the other side of the assembly. Visible are the secondary pump gears.





Now up to the bearing cover with drive shaft. The housing of this cover also contains some valves. On the bottom three gaskets, that come in gasket kit #100 270 22 01.





Here all the parts that go into the governor, and that are needed to complete the assembly. Refering to chapter 27-16: Top left to right: wire circlip 18, O-ring 17, spring guide cap 16, compensating washer 19, compression spring 20, and spring plate 21.
Next row left to right: compression spring 25, spring guide pin 23, pressure control piston 22, and governor housing 15.
Next row 4 cheese head screws for mounting the governor.
Fourth row down some bolts that do not below here (sorry).
Fifth row down: compression spring 48, compensating washer 47, pressure control piston 46, end plate 50 and cheese head screws 51.
Bottom row: compression spring over flow valve outside 45, same inside 44, compensating washers 43 and governor pressure transmitter piston 42.





48, 47 and 46:





45, 44, 43 and 42:





48, 47 and 46 on the right, 45, 44, 43 and 42 on the left.





Secure with plate plus gasket:





Line up of 18, 17, 16, 19, and 21:





Mount these parts on top of governor, here you see 21 (spring plate) into governor. Here you also see the numbering of the govenor parts, important later.






Here everything stacked. The new O-ring is around 16 (spring guide cap). It is a little tricky to push everything in and mount the circlip.





Now 22, 23 and 25 go into the other side of the governor. The spring guide pin 23 looks dirty, but that is just in the picture somehow.





Here everything mounted in the back of the governor, on the right. On the left the bearing cover, I filed off the nasty little burrs on the bottom of the slotted shaft. Be sure you orient the bottom of the slotted shaft (06:00 position) with govenor position '1'.





Govenor mounted on bearing cover with drive.





Now we mount the drive bushing on the pump drive shaft:





And mount the pumps also to the bearing cover.





Here the final result. Be sure you can turn the gear in the center easily!!!






1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP

Edited by - paul-NL on 08/31/2017 12:28:30
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aplekker

USA
494 Posts

Posted - 01/19/2010 :  11:17:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here a story on removing the reaction valves. In the K4B 050 manual MB warns not to take these out, since in order to do so you have to remove the oil tubes. These oil tubes are the small tubes that connect the reaction valves to the valve body. They are pressed into the aluminum transmission case, and trying to pry these out with pliers or a screw driver would damage the bore. In a picture in the manual they show a special tool, but in the text they tell you this tool is not available.
Anyway, after cleaning the transmission case with the soda blaster, I found out that a lot of soda found it's way into the reaction valves. So I decided to take these out, to be sure that they are OK and clean. After looking at MB's special tool I determined that the trick in removing these tubes is to find a way to pull them out straight, without prying or wiggling.
Here are these tubes and valves. The tubes are on top, pressed into the case. The reaction valves are the larger steel cylindrical parts below.





A little blurp about reaction valves. These valves are often overlooked when rebuilding a transmission. The function of these valves is to determine the exact moment when a brake band drum stops spinning. At that moment the command is given to lock the brake band, so they are very important for smooth shifting. There are two sides to a brake band: the side that the piston pushes into, and the side where the brake band connects to the transmission case. The reaction valve is mounted on the side of the brake band where it connects to the transmission. The oil tubes have a flange in them that is conical shaped at the bottom. Here is what they look like:





So in order to grab it from the top, you need to find a way to slide something over the tube that grabs around the flange (or collar). I came up with this part. The bottom of this part (on the left side) has a ridge (hard to see), the top has M8 screw thread, and the bottom part can move more open or closed. The idea is to move the bottom part over the tube flange, to squeeze the tool, and pull up (towards the right in the picture).





Here the tool positioned on the tube. Now we need to squeeze the bottom part. Later I might mount a small bolt side ways, but for now we will use a more primitive method.





And that is a hose clamp...





We put some spacers on the transmission case:





And clamp a drilled plate on the case.





Now we mount a bolt into the end of the tool, and position the nut plus washer as shown.





Here a look from the bottom.





When we start turning the nut clock wise while holding the bolt stationary, the tool will move upwards. Here you can see the tube about half way pulled out, completely in a straight line up.





And here the tube is out.





Now we are ready to pull the reaction valves out





When we will mount the tubes later again, we will use the same plate and bolts. However, with these adapters we will push the tube back into the hole, in an exact straight line.





Here is how the adapter slides over the tube:






1965 600 SWB #248
1968 6.3 #0347
1971 6.3 #5745 Euro
1979 6.9 #6857 Euro
1979 450SLC 5.0 EURO
1981 300SD
1989 560SEL
2003 CL600 Brabus T12 570HP

Edited by - paul-NL on 08/31/2017 12:45:17
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paul-NL

Netherlands
4261 Posts

Posted - 01/19/2010 :  11:41:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
zeer zeer listig, albert
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